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From The Bookshelf: Starting A Blog

Creatively Driven's: From the Bookshelf

One great way to promote your business is starting a blog. Blogs can be a great outlet to share ideas, demonstrate expertise, or show the sneak peaks and behind the scenes of new projects. They can serve as another outlet to generate traffic and get you noticed. But where to start? If you’re internet savvy you could probably set up your own blog no sweat, but for the rest of the population, the words tumblr, blogger, and wordpress just make your eyes glaze over. Have no fear! Blogging can be as easy as sending an email.

It can be hard to know where to start, and it’s true there’s an overwhelming amount of free information on the web, but it can be fragmented, and for the beginner, it’s best to have a comprehensive guide by the same source. I’ve spent many a night pulling my hair out looking for the right tutorial. That being said, I have two books about starting a blog that are very similar, but both great in their own ways.

The first is book is called Blog inc. by founder of Oh Joy! blogJoy Deangdeelert Choone of my favorite bloggers and how to writers. This is the 4th book in a .inc series about being a creative entrepreneur and probably my favorite so far. She writes casually, as if giving advice to a friend, and she breaks up the information with inspiring interviews from well established bloggers, which makes the book easy to get through.

This book is a great overview and “best advice” guide of starting a blog incorporating a personal tone.  I highly suggest this book if you already have some skill with blogging but want to make it more than a hobby or if you enjoy the more personal approach of reading success stories.

The second book I found super helpful was, Blogging For Creatives by Robin Houghton, another blogger/marketer/consultant. This book has a lot of the same content, but what I found more appealing was the layout of the content (Gee, a designer likes a book for its layout…) , the visual inspiration on every page, and step by step instructions on setting up a blog on different platforms (blogger, tumblr, wordpress etc.). This is the big difference between these two books. While Blog Inc. has some great interviews on how people came up with their blogs, and gives best practices advice, it lacks visual examples. I highly suggest this book to those who are more visual like myself, and are looking for step by step instructions on setting up a blog.

1 Comment
  • RT @Cre8tivedrive: From The Bookshelf: #Blogging>> http://t.co/wcv0nTLD featuring #bloginc from @ohjoystudio and #bloggingforcrea …

    9 November, 2012 at 9:28 am